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heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
. that is how we got obamacare, a federal education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that p
education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that policy change is having the federa
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
adults. finally, with the department of education, hhs will soon launch what we are calling a national dialogue on mental health to help change the conversation and galvanize action about our children's mental health. we have come a long way in the prevention, treatment, and recovery support for mental and addictive disorders, but we have a long way to go, and we can do better. thank you for your time today, and i would be very pleased to answer any questions you may have. >> thank you very much. now we will turn to dr. insel. welcome, once again. please proceed. >> thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member alexander, and members of the committee. it is a real honor to be here, and it is a real pairing to have hyde -- administrator hyde and me on the same panel. as a person coming to you from the national institute of mental health and the national institutes of health, my role is around the research related to mental illness and thinking about how to come up with the science that will lead to better diagnostics, better therapeutics, a better understanding of what you called a silent epi
's program. so whether it's bridging and roads or medical research or education or a number of other things fall under the discretionary category including definite spending. i simply say, we have to come to the realization that unless we can address our mandatory spending, which is running away with the budget and ever shrinking's congress' ability about how we use discretionary spending. unless we can get control of that, everybody is going fall short of what they want. i'm not debating as more money should go to medical research or building infrastructure or whatever. i'm simply saying all is being squeezed and i'm asking you to support your senator or senators or representatives in giving them the backbone and the courage to stand up we have to address this or everybody loses. and i think that is the message of the day. and now we had an election over that issue. we're having a debate in congress every day over that issue. until this point, the president has not indicated post election that he's all that happy about addressing the mandatory spending issue. and we can't get there until h
cost of whenever you're buying. with us now, consumer education president, smart credit dot com. the president of optimum capital management. great to have you both year. al start with you. what do you make of this? >> this is really bad news for consumers. we are already getting nickel-and-dimed to death, and we are about to get even worse. essentially, the fee that the market had -- merchant has to pay to exit the credit card, cone -- commonly called a slight fee, in the past they have not been able to charge a line-item extra cost to the consumer to cover that. starting this sunday will be allowed to. that is the bad news. they have already baked in that she in the price of the merchandise the you're buying. so now not only unable to charge a fee on top of what you're already purchasing, but essentially paying the fee to times over, and those of us to pay cash are really getting screwed because we're still paying the fee for people using credit cards. gerri: i want to show people some of the details. sunday, storms have to inform customers if you're an online merchant as well
. education, human capital, the ability to work with information technology. these are huge determinants. many people in american society today cannot afford by themselves to get the kind of education. to make resources available, support younger people, support families, institute, human capital, that is good for them, that's good for the economy and that's good for the tax base. over the medium term it will strengthen the projects. >> in terms of competitiveness, worldwide, building a stronger workforce from, as you mentioned, early childhood education to access to a college education is really vital to american competitiveness, isn't it? >> it's the number one determined that both our competitiveness, and our productivity, how much do we produce. number one determined, looking forward, human capital, education, that ability to innovate, ability to work with new technologists. >> over the short run, what is the effect of a cross the board cuts on early childhood education, on pell grants, on research funding for medical research and other basic scientific research? .. >> thank you, mr. chair
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
, the u.s. department of education announced that public school districts must give kids like owen, and other students with disabilities, an equal chance to play in school sports. >> once a child has more opportunity, you're going to have more kids participating. once they see their friends with disabilities participating, they're going to want to participate. >> reporter: but critics claim creating more sports for the disabled, will require more money. jeopardizing funding for other scholastic and athletic programs. on his blog, education secretary arne duncan wrote, they don't have to do anything that would provide a student with a disability an unfair competitive advantage. but they do need to make reasonable modifications. as for owen, his chance on the court landed him espn fame. >> and he just starts chucking threes. >> reporter: he also received an award from the harlem globetrotters. most importantly, his success on the court has given him more confidence off the court. >> this is about building the character of owen and the character of the kids here. and i think these kid
to try to educate our youth about the responsibility of using a firearm, the dangers of using a firearm? >> yeah. in a true way, to educate young people about both the responsibility and the true dangers, that's not a bad thing. what is a bad thing is blatantly marketing these guns to young people. basically it exposes the true colors of the gun lobby. they're not concerned in the gun industry. they're not concerned about the prevention of gun violence. they're just concerned about selling more guns. the rest of the american public wants to engage in a meaningful conversation about exactly what you're saying. what we can do respectful of the second amendment right to own guns, respectful of the fact that hunting and target shooting and protection are deeply ingrained notions. and, you know, in a lot of our country. but have that conversation simultaneous to the risks associated with having guns in the home and what we can do to prevent tragedies. >> sure. the tragedy that is most fresh on everyone's mind, newtown. right now there's a hearing under way in connecticut about stopping gun v
newsroom. the west education campus in d.c. closed today because of a power outage. >> in virginia, culpeper, king george, page, stafford, spotsylvania and warren counties are all closed today. orange county and fredericksburg public schools on a two-hour delay. >>> anne arundel county public schools are doing a two-hour early dismissal this afternoon. that was apparently planned. ahead of the next storm, it's a smart move. tom kierein here with exactly what we should expect today. tom in. >> here we snow again. later today, a similar event like thursday morning. when we got that light snow. enough to cause problems. right now it's frigid had friday morning. we're down into the teens. prince george's county, article ton, fairfax, montgomery counties, down into mid and upper teens. right at reagan national near 20. in the upper teens near the bay. inland, southern maryland got the heavier snow yesterday. it's only around 10 degrees now. hour by hour throughout the day, we'll have thickening clouds through the morning. by 9:00, 10:00. it's going to be in the low 20s. low to mid 20s b
to do work on jobs. we need to do work on global warming, on education, on deficit, but to do that now in the senate, majority doesn't rule. it requires 60 votes. nothing in the constitution about having to have 60 votes to pass a piece of legislation. the republicans have demanded hundreds of filibusters, brought forth hundreds of filibusters in recent years. i'm kind of old-fashioned. i think they should have all the time it needs to get up on the floor and state their case. i suspect minority rights. but the american people are hurting. they want action. we can't -- we cannot address the major issues if we continue to need 60 votes and the legislation yesterday did not deal with that issue. >> senator bernie sanders, always good to have you on the program. thank you. >> thank you. >> ryan, he wasn't alone in voting no. a lot of people have concern about this filibuster bill, that it's so watered down, it doesn't go far enough. i mean it may help with some things like the kinds of delays in appointments that the president has complained about to things like judges. is it a step in th
to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legislature is almost evenly divided. if we pass our budget last week with 94 of 100 boats. i think we have been successful and beginning to get past the partisanship. this time to quit playing games and finding compromises. >> other specific things you were trying to do to make colorado more business friendly? >> we have efforts in every single agency of state government to cut spec
finance over a period of years and her goal is to educate people so the great depression will never happen again. but it's very much in a buy of its time an idea we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills will all be okay. >> california senator dianne feinstein proposed legislation today that would then so-called assault weapons and ammunition magazines with more than 10 rounds. she was joined by other members of congress as well as police officers and mayors around the country. this is a little more than an hour. >> i want to thank all of you for coming today and i really want to welcome you. i am pleased to be joined this morning by a cross-section of americans who have been affected by gun violence. we have with us today police chiefs, mayors, teachers,.yours, members of the clergy, mothers, gun safety groups, victims of gun violence and others who care deeply about the issue. i'd really like to thank my colleagues in the senate and in the house who have chosen to stand together on this important issue. some of us have been working to provide violence for decades. t
to the state of new jersey if they were to reach certain goals on -- for schools. >> education. >> education grants to the state of new jersey and they hit it, $200 million from zuckerberg and $200 million from a matching grant why would liberals not want more of that. >> the reason they pulled it back, they don't want to get him mad. he gives a lot of money to democrats and the stupid thing to do is attack him for doing the fundraiser. >> in the old days you'd call up an yell at them. >> we used to put fire things in the garbage... >> do you want to talk about intolerantly liberals, mark zuckerberg or bobby jindal. >> i want to talk about everything. my theory is the left, holds an axe over the right's head or farr their friends hope to right. it is social acceptance, if you want to go to the right parties, new york city and california and want to be accepted, and avoid ridicule, be like us, it is a form of social bullying and america accepted it because we see cool trumps character and liberals are more intolerant because they have a louder megaphone and, people like me are knuckle-draggin
of the state address. he promised continued education reform, holding the line on college tuition, and pushing the high-speed rail project through. but at the end of the day, the address was mostly about one thing. >> ling within our means and not spending what we don't have. the people have given us seven years of extra taxes. let us follow the wisdom of joseph. pay down our debts. >> while the governor's speech was upbeat, he faces a fight even within his own party for some proposes, including a plan to fund poorer schools, possibly at the expense of wealthy suburban districts. >>> it was dethawing last week. and now it's the rain. >> it was cold last week. a lot of folks got down to freezing. now we're seeing warmer nights because we have the cloud cover out there. the trade-off is rainfall. but that's not actually a bad thing. no rain out there now, but it was active around san jose and san ramon, livermore, pleasanton, dublin today. tonight, cbs 5's hi-def doppler, how about san jose? first 23 days of january, three tenths of an inch of
are not accessible -- educated about contraception and sex education. we have to look at these larger issues. >> i want to thank you for this film. lana wilson and martha shane made, "after tiller" that premiered this week at the sundance film festival on this 40th anniversary of the supreme court ruling of roe v. wade. when we come back, we go back and then go forward. we go back 50 years to a supreme court decision that guaranteed the right of everyone in the u.s. to a lawyer in criminal cases. what does that mean today? we follow a group of young, dedicated lawyers in the deep south fighting to defend those who cannot afford to hire their own lawyers. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from the sundance film festival in park city, utah. we turn now to a new film that looks at the struggles of public defenders -- lawyers who dedicate themselves to representing the poor. in some states, it's estimated 80% of people facing felony charges cannot afford to hire their own lawyers. often the lawy
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
is expected to cover education funding upgrading the state's infrastructure. we are live from the state capitol. >> reporter: good morning. yes, today's state of the state will be a whole lot different than the state of the state address last year. remember that last year the governor was in a full court press all year to try to convince voters to approve a tax hike to deal with california's bumming. well, he successfully succeeded in doing that. so now his clout couldn't be lier and today we expect him to outline his vision on other issues beyond what last year was which was all about taxes and that's going to include as you said education, a big one. he is going to reveal a plan we expect that will offer more money and resources to poorer schools or those student who are more in need than others and also to address public universities to try to compel them to cut costs to students as well as making courses more prevalent online. infrastructure is another big one as he is expected to push for high speed rail and to talk act water issues and trying to build two massive tunnels to move w
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
was supposed to just go strictly for education and now, of course, we have learned only half of it, maybe less will go toward education. shep. >> shepard: he could move, i suppose. and there is a welcome mat out for him. >> oh, yeah. the texas governor rick perry from no tax, texas has said he would put the welcome mat out in a tweet i'm quoting here hey phil, texas is home to liberty and low taxes. we would love to have you as well. phil's long time rival on the golf course tiger woods also a california native. tiger says the reason he left california back in 1996 is because of taxes. a move that saved him well over $100 million. the experts say even the rich are keeping track. listen. >> we're under the impression if a person has 10 they won't miss three. if that person is earning that money, i assure you they will miss every single dime. >> others have a different view. syracuse professor wrote and i'm quoting please stop whining and give thanks for being able to earn a fabulous living playing a game and selling golf clubs even after tax 99 pulp the 99% of people would never have that optio
's really about educating that. whether you have a disability or not, everyone should be involved. and i think it's great that, you know, it's being taken into action into schools. you know, this opens up huge doors, you know. like people going to college right after high school, getting, you know, a letter, being part of high school sports is a huge thing. it's getting involved in high school opens up so many doors and i'm really, really excite about this. and i'm honored that it happened. >> i was looking at some of the policies and examples of what schools can do to make sure that a disabled athlete can compete with an abled athlete. something like this. a track athlete who might be deaf can't hear the gun, so if you just bring some flashing lights out onto the track, that gives them the same opportunity and the same way to compete as their counterparts. some people would say also that's going to cost some money because there are going to have to be some changes across the board and now that the government is saying if these schools don't do this, they're going to have money withheld,
is a fearless leader, answering the call to serve throughout his career. work on issues from education and transporation to civil rights and national service advanced the causes of the party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] now let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. marina alana, with your support today, serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive treasurer of the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service as president of the tier local 11 # reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. she'll strengthen the bond between the dnc and brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friends, congresswoman of hawaii, with your support today, will also serve as vice chair. she's the first american indue member of congress, and along with the congresswoman of illinois, one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [a
investments in infrastructure. we say that training and education must be expanded to build the workforce we need for a 21st century global economy. and we call for an expanded focus on ports, exports and advanced manufacturing to great more jobs in america and reduce our trade imbalance. on all of these issues we took aggressive action. our conference of mayors engage direct with the obama administration and congress through every step of fiscal cliff negotiations. at the national press club on september 15, we released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president bid
through different ideas, from education, but just right off the bat, the irs has a suggested amount that you can multiply by the number of exemptions and subtract from your income. so also the main thing, gretchen, is that you're filing the right way. married, obviously a couple, married. that's a great way to file. head of household. if you are divorced, it's a little tricky. are you the head of the household for over six months? are you the primary care giver and incurring most of the cost. in which case, this child is your dependent. >> gretchen: so only one much you can claim this. >> right. >> gretchen: tax blessing number two, the child tax credit. what's that? >> so this one, you get $1,000 credit per child. gone are the days that you're passing down the money so freely to the kids. that is taxed so heavily. we know that for a fact. so let's go with this one. get in there and try and get that $1,000 tax credit. there is no forms, nothing. just put in for it. if you have more than one child, orgeat form, the 8812. it will compute that one. this one you could even get a refund
states, you have to do education and you got to do treatment, because what we have is just a revolving circle of demand and we are not alone. europe is a huge demand, russia now increasing demand. cocaine routes and marijuana routes are not just coming up from colombia and other countries and latin america and the caribbean up to here, but going across the atlantic and going to other countries and comes from asia. it is pandemic. so i think we need a more comprehensive approach, one where it is less finger pointing and you work cooperatively to understand everybody's role in trying to do something about it. i have always felt that this label of war on drugs, is kind of artificial, because war implies is it's all out and you have to win. and i don't think it's all been out. and principally because we have failed to do our part in education, and abstinence. we have to engage ourselves and that would help establish credibility and viability with other countries. >> thank you very much for those answers. >> senator paul. >> senator kerry, thanks for coming today and your testimony. i agree
the americans who come here over the summer but you typically get a perceived more educated more sophisticated crowd belichick more politically aware. >> and people in the interest of having a good time. and that's sort of the difference between the average tourist season and inauguration is a lot of people are in a better mood. it makes things more fun when you are out and about on the town. >> people are so happy to be here and so excited to see different stuff. the people i ran into over the weekend, it's cool. like i said, i live in adams-morgan and i saw people on 18th street, which is a big party district if you are not familiar with it in d.c. people out there having a good time. it's hard to put a value on that, especially this day and age in our country where things aren't great for everybody. you can see people coming together to have a good time in a peaceful manner. scomplvrnlths. >> we were up to dinner friday night and last night. the restaurant was packed. it was a different mood. it wasn't just your average night in a restaurant. people were h
but that is not stopping a teachers grew from hand-picking bill ayers. he will address teacher educators next month in atlanta. ayers was involved in a townhouse bombing in new york city that left three people dead. >>steve: singer james taylor says he knows what gun owners want. >> i think the majority of us feel strongly, even the majority of gun owners feel strongly that we need to make some sacrifice to our freedoms if that's the way to put it. >>brian: is he wearing scalia's hat? >>steve: taylor made the comment after performing at the inauguration. advocates very concerned about the president's proposal on gun control if you take aspirin, it can triple your chances of going blind. those who take it on a regular basis can cause age related macular degeneration. >>gretchen: they tell you to take it for your heart and blood thinning. >>steve: the low dose. >>gretchen: watch this. a huge lighting fixture falls from above landing on the child during a meet in wisconsin. he had just gotten into position to start up the match again when it happened. luckily he only needed a few stitches. no word on
that we have our advocates and tribal leaders from across the country out there working in d.c. educating congress and making sure that they understand, first who we are as a tribal nation, and then the need for us to have jurisdiction over non-indians who come onto our reservations for these narrow scopes of crime, which is domestic violence sexual assault. it's not something that is unreasonable. and we feel our courts and law enforcement, we are prepared to make sure that these crimes go prosecuted and no longer get thrown by the way side. frankly our women are being thrown on the way side. >> jennifer: exactly. this feeling that native american women are some how disposable. that they don't have the same rights as the rest of the human beings, which is insane. one of the most vocal opponents of reauthorizing the violence against women act is eric cantor. what would you say to him if you were to meet him face to face? >> i would tell him that our indian women are very important in the united states, and we deserve protection too. we deserve to walk free on our lands and make sure that
to the state of new jersey if they were to reach certain goals on, for schools. education grants to the state of new jersey. they hit it $200 million from zuckerberg. $200 million comes from a matching grant. why would liberals be so intolerant they don't want more of that? that is something they should want more of. >> bob: the reason they pulled it back is simple. they don't want to get him in trouble because he gives money to democrats. >> dana: in the old days they used to call up and yell at him, right? instead of putting a post up. >> bob: we'd put fire in his car. >> dana: do you want to talk about into janet liberals, mark zuckerberg or bobby jindal? >> greg: i want to talk about everything. >> dana: go ahead. >> greg: my theory is the left used to hold an ax over the right's head or their friends on the right. it's called social acceptance. if you want to go to the right parties. especially in new york city or california, if you want to be accepted and avoid ridicule, be like us. it's a form of social bullying. it has been around forever. weird way america accepted it because we see
% from the national public radio, maybe other departments, department of education by 1%, through attrition, there's 75,000 jobs that are now filled. we shouldn't fill them. and then as people retire, re we don't fill those jobs jobs so gs hurt. you see the cost of living adjustment, to make it more real, that would reduce a whole out lot of our budget that doesn't need to be there the cola is adjusted on certain -- we all know what has happened the cost of housing. has it gone up? no. so why do we still have these adjustments of social security, keep ratcheting up the social security payments. we know it's broke. i want to use these numbers one more time. if you take eight years off the government numbers, you have an how hold 21,000 does, pending $38,000 and $142,000 credit card debt. so women down in washington, dc said we're going to cut that budget. you know what okay cut it by? $385. so you're the ones going to pay the price for this. i'm home free. if i want to buy $84,000 america america, so i go to my dealer and she says, sign here. he said your credit card is maxed0. y
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